Back to Search Page
To print this page, select format and Click Here

Search Results Resources

25 matching records.

You searched on:
Keyword: Throat; Language: English

Achalasia

Patient UK

Achalasia is an uncommon condition that affects the muscles of your oesophagus (gullet). It usually causes difficulty in swallowing both food and fluids. There are different treatments available which can improve symptoms

English - Online Resource

View online

Achalasia

the NHS website

Achalasia means that your gullet has lost its ability to move food along and the valve at the end of your gullet fails to open to allow food to pass into your stomach. As a result, food gets stuck in your gullet and is often brought back up.

English - Online Resource

View online

Adenoids and adenoidectomy

the NHS website

Adenoids are small lumps of tissue located at the back of the throat, above the tonsils. They are part of the immune system, which helps fight infection and protects the body from bacteria and viruses.

English - Online Resource

View online

Cancer - Nasopharyngeal

the NHS website

Nasopharyngeal cancer is cancer that affects the nasopharynx. This is the area where the nose and throat connect. This type of cancer is sometimes called throat cancer.

English - Online Resource

View online

Cancer - Thyroid

the NHS website

Thyroid cancer is a rare type of cancer that affects the thyroid gland, a small gland at the base of the neck that produces hormones. It's most common in people in their 30s and those over the age of 60. Women are two to three times more likely to...

English - Online Resource

View online

Catarrh

the NHS website

Catarrh is an excessive build-up of mucus in one of the airways or cavities of the body. It is usually found inside the nose, but it can also occur in the: - throat - ears - chest

English - Online Resource

View online

Common cold

the NHS website

A cold is a mild viral infection of the nose, throat, sinuses and upper airways. It can cause nasal stuffiness, a runny nose, sneezing, a sore throat and a cough. Usually it's a self-limiting infection – this means it gets better by itself without th...

English - Online Resource

View online

Dysphagia (Difficulty Swallowing)

Patient UK

There are various causes of dysphagia (difficulty swallowing). See your doctor as soon as possible if you develop dysphagia. This is because a serious condition such as cancer of the oesophagus can be the cause. As a general rule, the earlier a serio...

English - Booklet / Leaflet / Factsheet / Flyer

View online

Dysphagia (swallowing problems)

the NHS website

Dysphagia is a medical term for difficulty with swallowing. Some people with dysphagia have problems swallowing certain foods or liquids, while others cannot swallow at all.

English - Online Resource

View online

Endoscopy / Gastroscopy

Patient UK

Diagram - Endoscopy / Gastroscopy

English - Diagrams

View online

Epiglottitis

the NHS website

Epiglottitis is inflammation and swelling of the epiglottis. It's often caused by an infection, but can also sometimes occur as a result of a throat injury. The epiglottis is a flap of tissue that sits beneath the tongue at the back of the throat....

English - Online Resource

View online

Goitre

the NHS website

A goitre (sometimes spelt 'goiter') is an abnormal swelling of the thyroid gland that causes a lump to form in the throat.

English - Online Resource

View online

Heartburn and acid reflux

the NHS website

Heartburn is a burning feeling in the chest caused by stomach acid travelling up towards the throat (acid reflux). If it keeps happening, it’s called gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).

English - Online Resource

View online

Laryngitis

the NHS website

Laryngitis is inflammation of the larynx (voice box). Symptoms of laryngitis include: - hoarseness, - loss of voice, and - sore throat

English - Online Resource

View online

Larynx

Patient UK

Diagram - Larynx

English - Diagrams

View online

Larynx and Thyroid Gland

Patient UK

Diagram - Larynx & Thyroid Gland

English - Diagrams

View online

Pemphigus vulgaris

the NHS website

Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare disease that causes severe blistering of the skin and the mucous membranes lining the mouth, nose, throat and genitals. The mouth is almost always affected, which can make eating and brushing of teeth very painful.

English - Online Resource

View online

Quinsy

the NHS website

Quinsy is a complication of tonsillitis. It is a collection of pus that develops between the back of one of your tonsils and the wall of your throat. This is known as an abscess. An abscess can develop when an infection spreads from a swollen tonsil ...

English - Online Resource

View online

Salivary Glands

Patient UK

Diagram - salivary glands

English - Diagrams

View online

Snoring

the NHS website

Snoring is when a person makes a snorting or rattling noise while they are asleep. It occurs when the soft tissue at the back of the mouth, nose or throat vibrates when a person breathes in and out.

English - Online Resource

View online

Sore throat

the NHS website

A sore throat, also known as pharyngitis, is normally a symptom of a bacterial or viral infection, such as the common cold. In around a third of cases, no cause for the sore throat can be found.

English - Online Resource

View online

Throat Infection Test

Lab Tests Online UK

Also known as: Throat culture Formal name: Group A streptococcus; Group A beta haemolytic streptococcus; streptococcus pyogenes The majority of sore throats are caused by a virus and do not require active treatment wit...

English - Online Resource

View online

Tonsillitis

the NHS website

Tonsillitis is an infection of the tonsils. The tonsils are two small glands found at the back of the throat behind the tongue. The function of these glands is not entirely clear, but research suggests that they help to fight infections. The main sym...

English - Online Resource

View online

Tonsils and Adenoids

Patient UK

Tonsils are made of soft glandular tissue and are part of the immune system. You have two tonsils, one on either side at the back of the mouth. Adenoids are also made of glandular tissue and are part of the immune system. They hang from the upper par...

English - Booklet / Leaflet / Factsheet / Flyer

View online

Tracheostomy

the NHS website

A tracheostomy is an opening created at the front of the neck so a tube can be inserted into the windpipe (trachea) to help you breathe. If necessary, the tube can be connected to an oxygen supply and a breathing machine called a ventilator. Th...

English - Online Resource

View online